Ad*Access Project

Elizabeth Arden advertisementThe Ad*Access Project, funded by the Duke Endowment “Library 2000” Fund, presents images and database information for over 7,000 advertisements printed in U.S. and Canadian newspapers and magazines between 1911 and 1955. Ad*Access concentrates on five main subject areas: Radio, Television, Transportation, Beauty and Hygiene, and World War II, providing a coherent view of a number of major campaigns and companies through images preserved in one particular advertising collection available at Duke University. The advertisements are from the J. Walter Thompson Company Competitive Advertisements Collection of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History in Duke University’s Rare Book, Manuscript, and Special Collections Library.  The advertisements on this web site have been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study.

Burma-Shave advertisement

ARTstor’s Images for Academic Publishing (IAP)

Ever notice the little icons below the image thumbnails while you’re browsing ARTstor? One of the icons simply says “IAP,” which means images for academic publishing. This ARTstor program “seeks to facilitate scholarship in the arts by reducing the costs associated with publishing images in academic journals and similar publications.” Images with an IAP icon associated with them are available to use free of charge in scholarly publications. There are currently 6,700 images provided by the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and 3,900 images from the Mellink Archive at Bryn Mawr College. For more information regarding this program, click here or contact ARTstor.

Making flashcards in ARTstor

Spending hours making flashcards for exams? Why not let ARTstor do the work for you. Below are step-by-step instructions on how to do this.

1. Register for an ARTstor account and login. If you don’t know how to register for an account, watch this video.

2. Once you are logged in, search for the images you’ll need to study. If your instructor posts their lecture images in ARTstor, find them by clicking on the “folders and image groups” link in the middle of  the main page and scanning the list for your class.

3. Once you’ve found the images you’ll need, select them by single clicking on each one. A red border will appear around the ones that you’ve selected. To deselect, single click on the image again so that the border goes away.

4. Once your images are selected, go to the  organize menu at the top of the page and go to “save selected images to…” Here you can either create a new image group, or add images to an existing image group.

5. When the pop-up screen appears to ask you where you want to save your image group, make sure your work group is highlighted.

6. Once you have selected a name and destination for your image group, click on “save and open.”

7. Now that you’ve opened your image group, go to the share menu at the top of the page and click on “print image group.” You’ll have your choice of how much information you want on your flashcards.

8. Once you make your selection, a new window will pop up displaying your flash cards. Here, you can print them out. Make sure that your pop-up windows are disabled when using ARTstor.

brief record with instructor notes

A Digital Collection Celebrating the Founding of the Historically Black College and University

A Digital Collection Celebrating the Founding of the Historically Black College and University is a collection of primary resources from HBCU libraries and archives. It includes several thousand scanned pages and represents HBCU libraries first collaborative effort to make a historic collection digitally available. Collections are contributed from member libraries of the Historically Black College and University Library Alliance.  The collection includes photographs, university correspondence, manuscripts, images of campus buildings, alumni letters, memorabilia, and programs from campus events.  These images present HBCUs as cultural, social, and political institutions from the early 1800’s until today.  See information on copyright and use.  (Text and image from collection website.)

“The Commons” on Flickr

Flickr is home to “The Commons,” a public photo collection that began in 2008 as a collaboration between Flickr and the Library of Congress. It has since expanded to include over 45 institutions, including NASA, the Imperial War Museum, and the New York Public Librar. The Commons is host to thousands of images covering a breadth of subjects, all copyright free.

Users are invited to add tags and descriptions to the photos, making the collection richer and more accessible.


Europeana provides access to over six million digital items, including images, texts, sounds, and videos. It is funded by the European Commission and its member states, and includes content from museum, galleries, libraries, archives, and audio-visual collections.

The extensive list of organizations that Europeana pulls its content from includes notable institutions such as the Rijksmuseum, the British Library, and the Louvre.

Currently the online collection is in its beta version, but version 1.0 will be launch later in 2010 and will include links to over ten million digital items.