New ARTstor filtered search

If you’ve been searching for images in ARTstor this morning, you may have noticed that there are now a few extra options to filter your search results page. Click on the tab that says “narrow your results,” and a column will appear on the left side of your screen with classification and geography filters. In addition, a time line will appear at the top of your screen where you can slide the markers to specify an earliest date and a latest date. While these filtering options are available already in the “advanced search” feature, this new interface will help to streamline the simple, quick searches that users utilize most often.

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Graphics Atlas

Ever wonder what  the difference is between an engraving and an etching? Graphics Atlas, a project of the Image Permanence Institute, will show you. With this tool, users can compare different printing techniques side by side and learn about the methods used for each technique. In addition, the site features fantastic visual tools such as the ability to zoom in and out, flip the page over, see a side view, and change the light source. The mediums discussed range from pre-photogenic (etchings, mezzotints) to digital.

Rome in a day

The Architecture department at the University of Oregon has developed two useful interactive mapping tools of Rome. The first, the interactive Nolli map of Rome, is a digitization of the 1748 map of Rome by Giambattista Nolli. This map is regarded by scholars as one of the most important historical documents of the city, and through the work of the University of Oregon the public now has access to this work. Users can zoom in and out, as well as add layers such as gardens, pathways, and fountains.

The second project is Imago Urbis: Giuseppe Vasi’s Grand Tour of Rome, which integrates the Nolli map with the work of Nolli’s contemporary, Giuseppe Vasi (1710-1782). Vasi’s detailed documentation of Rome’s buildings and monuments established him as one of the city’s greatest topographers. With this tool users can view Nolli’s map and Vasi’s plates simultaneously, making it easier to imagine Rome in the 18th century. Plates are grouped into 8 days of an itinerary, making the grand tour of Rome accessible from your couch.