Vintage Fashion Online

Move over ModCloth, for those interested in vintage fashion, the London College of Fashion’s Woolmark Company Collection has added over 2,000 newly digitized images of vintage fashion to its existing 2,500. These images can be seen via VADS. The description below is from Amy Robinson of VADS:

From catwalk to high street: vintage fashions go online

Nina Ricci, Guy Laroche, and Yves St. Laurent are just some of the top designers making up a veritable who’s who of fashion at the London College of Fashion’s Woolmark Company Collection. These ‘cool’ wool fashions may no longer be on the catwalk but they can be seen online via VADS

This week over 2000 newly digitised images have been launched online which complement these vintage fashions by key couturiers. These newly digitised images include examples from the ready-to-wear market by manufacturers such as British Home Stores, Berkertex, Windsmoor, Susan Small, and Marks & Spencer, as well as including more examples by top designers such as Mary Quant and Christian Dior.

The black and white photographs date from the 1940’s through to the early 1980’s and capture both the fashion of the time and the style of photography.  The press releases, which in some cases are still attached to the photographs, give additional information about the garments, designers, manufacturers, photographers and any points of interest reflecting the promotional style and language of the time.  All of the images were generously donated to the London College of Fashion from The International Wool Secretariat, now The Woolmark Company.

VADS now provides access to over 4,800 images from the Woolmark Company collection, which complements a number of other London College of Fashion collections already available online including its College Archive, Paper Patterns Collection, Cordwainer’s Shoe Collection, and Gala Cosmetics Archive.

For more information about the London College of Fashion’s Woolmark Company collection see

VADS offers over 120,000 fully cross-searchable images which are free to use and copyright cleared for learning, teaching, and research.

For more information about VADS collections, see or contact VADS at / 01252 892723

To keep up to date with VADS news, follow their blog.

CITES Teaching with technology forum

For anyone interested in finding and using digital images for teaching or research, there is a “brown bag” lunchtime talk coming up this Wednesday (the 23rd of February) that will be discussing ARTstor. The information is as follows:

Teaching with Technology Brown Bag Forum–Wednesday, February 23 (12-1pm) at 23 Illini Hall

All Things Images: Using ARTstor for Teaching and Research, Presented by: Sarah Christensen, Visual Resources, and Anne D. Hedeman, Art History

With the need for digital images becoming more prevalent in classrooms, ARTstor can be a useful resource in finding, organizing, sharing, and presenting these images. As a digital image library, ARTstor contains images from a wide variety of disciplines outside of art, so don’t let the name fool you! Sarah Christensen will discuss how to make the features of ARTstor work for you, while Anne D. Hedeman will demonstrate how she utilizes ARTstor in her Compass course site.

If you can’t attend, the talk will be recorded and posted online shortly after. That link will be posted here as well.


Hope you can make it!

ARTstor Mobile

ARTstor MobileAll 1,000,000+ images from the ARTstor Digital Library are now accessible through iPad, iPhone, and the iPod Touch to registered ARTstor users. ARTstor Mobile provides read-only features such as searching, browsing, zooming, and viewing saved image groups. Also try the new Flashcard View, which allows you to test your knowledge by viewing the image without textual information, and then flipping the image to reveal the image record.  There’s no need to download special software, just go to from your mobile device. ARTstor Mobile is only available through the Safari browser.  Click here for more information.

Google Art Project

Google’s new product, Google Art Project, uses it street view technology to allow users to “walk” around museums across the world. 

Museum included in the project are:

  • Alte Nationalgalerie, Berlin – Germany
  • Freer Gallery of Art, Smithsonian, Washington DC – USA
  • The Frick Collection, NYC – USA
  • Gemäldegalerie, Berlin – Germany
  • The Metropolitan Museum of Art, NYC – USA
  • MoMA, The Museum of Modern Art, NYC – USA
  • Museo Reina Sofia, Madrid – Spain
  • Museo Thyssen – Bornemisza, Madrid – Spain
  • Museum Kampa, Prague – Czech Republic
  • National Gallery, London – UK
  • Palace of Versailles – France
  • Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam – The Netherlands
  • The State Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg – Russia
  • State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow – Russia
  • Tate Britain, London – UK
  • Uffizi Gallery, Florence – Italy
  • Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam – The Netherlands

In addition to navigating the museums, users have access to high resolution images of over 1,000 selected paintings from these museums. With the ability to zoom to such an incredible degree, art lovers are able to examine the brushstrokes of each of the 486 artists represented. Below is an example of the detail one can achieve through the Google Art Project (can you guess the painting?):

Starry Night, Van Gogh

The images can’t be downloaded, but if you have a Google account you can “create an artwork collection.” With the collections, users can save and collect views of your favorite artworks, add comments at different zoom levels, and share with other Google users.

For more information on this project, follow the links below:

ABC News

Wall Street Journal


According to an article from Techradar, Google plans on expanding the project, but the timeline is uncertain.