Delt.ae: Your One Stop for Image Quality Assessment

When you upload to Instagram, do you always try to make sure your images are perfect? Is your crowning acheivement when you can prouldy post a photo with #nofilter? Before desparately taking multiple images, seeking out that perfect white balance, try Delt.ae!

Delt.ae is a free, professional grade, image quality assessment service. To use Delt.ae, simply register for an account, and begin uploading photos. Upon registering, in your ‘scans’ tab, a sample image is provided that will help you to understand the types of image assessments that Delt.ae runs.

So what does Deltae mean? According to the Delt.ae Wiki, “By definition, Delta-E (ΔE) is the scientific metric that describes the distance between two colors. The capital “E” stands for Empfindung, the German word for sensation. With the Greek character Delta (Δ), the difference is denoted. So a ΔE describes how your senses relate two colors.”

Essentially, Delt.ae compares your digital image to how the subject looks in reality based on the use of test-targets. These image test targets can not only assess image quality, but also determine such factors as lighting uniformity, geometry, resolution, and sharpness.  For a comprehensive list of the targets Delt.ae currently supports, click here.

Two image targets above the scan of a book.

Do note, however, that for Delt.ae to test your image, a target to scan does need to be physically present in the actual image (you can crop it out later). For a list of target specifications, checkout their guidelines on how to use and place targets within images, here.

Fair Use in the Visual Arts: College Art Association publishes “Code of Best Practices”

On Monday, February 9th, the College Art Association published a comprehensive guide to proper practices concerning copyrighted visual materials. The final product, the “Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for the Visual Arts,” is a document designed to outline instances when fair use can be applied to the utilization of copyrighted materials in making art, archiving, museums, and academic scholarship. The need for a document like this is great, as most of the art work referenced in scholarship, classrooms, art-practices, and archives is copyrighted.

The project began in 2012, led by Professor Patricia Aufderheide in communication studies and Professor Peter Jaszi in law at American University, with instruction from CAA’s Task Force on Fair Use. The project, funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, addresses five situations that centrally involve the use of copyrighted materials:

  • Writing about Art
  • Archives and Special Collections
  • Making Art
  • Exhibitions
  • Teaching about Art

This 20 page report not only introduces the idea of “fair use,” but also summarizes the guidelines for fair use involving each of the five categories in which copyrighted materials are used. So, what is fair use?

Generally speaking, fair use is a provision to the Copyright Act that allows certain use of copyrighted works without permission. Typically this pertains to contexts surrounding education or scholarly contexts.

The CAA also developed a clear and engaging infographic outlining both why the field of visual arts requires a fair use code, how this code was created, and the best ways to make use of this information. The infographic argues that many scholars, museum employees, and artists avoid engaging with certain material because it is copyrighted, creating a loss of potential scholarship, online exhibitions, and digital artwork. For particular questions or concerns about fair use, CAA has also provided a helpful FAQ.

Fair use has become especially important in the digital age as access to images has become easier than ever. As written by Aufderheide and Jaszi in the “Code of Best Practices,” “The goal of US copyright law is to promote the progress of knowledge and culture. Its best-known feature is protection of owner’s rights. But copying, quoting, recontextualizing, and reusing existing cultural materal can be critically important to creating and spreading knowledge and culture.”

Overall, the CAA’s development of a “Code of Best Practices” is an exciting one. Go forth and share these guidelines with your peers, and make use of them to further your scholarship, education, or artistic practice!

Halloween and TMA Air Photos

Last night, I had started mentally outlining a post about a wonderful new free resource that enables users to assess image quality based on calibration targets included in their images. But then I remembered that it’s Halloween, and I should instead pull together a post based on a spooky Halloween themed collection.

CA174831L0252_preview

CA174831L0252

While I came across a lot of great Halloween related material, including this collection from Wellcome Images, this 1903 film directed by Georges Méliès, and some charming children’s costumes via DPLA , what I decided to write about chilled me above all else. It is not a Medieval monster or menacing mummy, but rather a reminder of the very real Midwest winter to come. Specifically, it is the Antarctic Air Photography collection from the University of Minnesota.

Developed by the Polar Geospatial Center (PGC) at the University of Minnesota, this collection is comprised of more than 330,000 air photos, which were collected and scanned by the USGS EROS Data Center. The collection contains trimetrogon aerial photography, which is a method of taking three photos at one time: one vertical (in this collection, designated by a “V” in the filename), along with left and right obliques (at a 45° angle off nadir; designated by either “L” or “R”) taken along a single TMA flight line.

The easiest way to find Antarctic TMA photos, digitized flightline index maps, and approximate photo centers is through the PGC’s TMA Flightline Viewer, a web app that runs in your browser. The application allows users to browse and download Antarctic air photos digitally rather than having to search through rolls of film in the USGS archives. We even have camera calibration information here for those who need it.

Additionally, the PGC provides TMA flightline and photocenters data in two GIS formats: ESRI shapefiles (.shp) and Google Earth KMZ files. The files are separated by Antarctic region, such as Marie Byrd Land or Ross Island.

Users may also look up photos manually, rather than browsing by flightline or geographic region. A breakdown of USGS naming conventions is provided in order to help one navigate the data.

Have a happy and safe Halloween, and bundle up!

Google Open Gallery and Web Publishing

Google Open Gallery

Google Open Gallery

Many of you may already be familiar with the work of the Google Cultural Institute, such as the Google Art Project and numerous historical exhibitions. Yesterday, Google announced on it’s Europe blog that that technologies behind it’s Cultural Institute projects would be available to anyone wanting to organize and publish an exhibit.

Valentina Palledino, a writer for The Verge, describes Google Open Gallery as the love child between Flickr and Behance. Offering a clean, streamlined look with zoom capabilities, users many simply upload images and video and add Street View imagery and text to create engaging exhibitions.

Users must currently request an invitation to start creating exhibitions. Content is hosted on Google servers, and so users would be wise to create a backups exhibitions in the scenario that Open Gallery joins the list of retired Google services.

Current exhibitions have been produced from institutions such as the Belgian Comic Strip Center, Fort Collins Museum of Discovery, and the Museum of Bad Art.

In addition, for those lucky few traveling to Paris this winter break, Google has also opened the Lab at the Cultural Institute. This physical space is “where the worlds of culture and technology are brought together to discuss, debate and explore new ideas. It’s also where [Cultural Institute Employees] don our white coats and test out things like 3D scanners, million pixel cameras, interactive screens and more, working with museums to try them out inside their spaces to get their feedback. (Google Blog).

Online exhibition publishing for the masses isn’t a terribly new idea, however. Omeka is still a leader in this field, offering robust options for those wanting to host content on their own servers and also for those wanting to simplify with a hosted version. The University of Illinois Library maintains an institutional subscription to Omeka.net (the hosted version) for current students, faculty, and staff.

Scalar is a new, open source web publishing platform available, and is still in development. However, users may access the beta version, which is still fairly robust. This tool also has growing support at the University of Illinois; a series of workshops about Scalar occurred this past semester, and there may be more to come in the future.

Your Paintings: Putting the UK’s entire national collection of over 200,000 oil paintings online

In an article from The Guardian, art correspondent Mark Brown wrote, “The Public Catalogue Foundation [PCF], announced that it had succeeded, in partnership with the BBC, in its mission to put images of every publicly owned oil painting in the UK online – that means every painting, good or bad, on display or in stores, and whether owned by museums, galleries, councils or universities. Those held by police stations, zoos and a lighthouse are also included.”

site-1024.jpg

The online collection recently made the news when an art historian using Your Paintings identified a previously unknown painting as the work of 17th Century master Van Dyck.

The PCF will continue to work on Your Paintings as there are still nearly 30,000 paintings which are unattributed and it wants to correct that. It is also planning a similar exercise for publicly owned sculpture.

You may browse the collection at Your Paintings’ website, and there is also a Tagger Project that invites users to participate and help to make Your Paintings more searchable.

Help us tag the Nation's Art Collection

Interactive Images with ThingLink

I love images. I love links that let me know more about an image. I may love ThingLink, but it is too soon to tell. How would you use it?

ThingLink

ThingLink

ThingLink lets you embed images with everything from text to a YouTube video to a link to your Etsy shop. Hovering over an image activates icons on the image, hovering over an icon gives you a preview of the annotation.

ThingLink will ensure that you will not miss out on any opportunity to share your online presence. Let us know how you are using ThingLink!

New Year, New Site!

The Visual Resources Center is pleased to announce the launch of their new website!

Image

Find images!

Discover tools for editing, presenting and preserving visual materials!

Get help and further resources!

The new website contains much of the same content as the old, but we’ve moved things around in the hopes of making it more streamlined and easier to find what you’re looking for. Please send us any comments or suggestions you may have!

Instructional images will continue to be available via ARTstor.

ImageSearch from the University of Illinois Library: Federated search for images

EasySearch, from the University of Illinois Library,  is a component of Search Assistant, a resource discovery path for users which allows for searching across multiple electronic resources in a subject area. The Library recently added an image search function by which you can limit search results to images only.  The image search functionality searches and returns results for images from across 25 extensive online resources:  Google Images; Library of Congress Image Search; National Portrait Gallery; Flickr; USA.gov Images; V&A Images; NASA Images; Earth Science World Image Bank; Fish & Wildlife Digital Library; Getty Images; David Rumsey Map Collection; SpringerLink Images; UIUC ContentDM Digital Collections; CARLI Digital Collections; Illinois Harvest; World Digital Library; Europeana; National Park Service; National Archives; Smithsonian Institution; Emilio Segre Visual Archives; AGSL Photo Archive; Animal Science Image Gallery; and VADS.  From the EasySearch screen, select “Advanced Search,” enter your search terms, and click the box to limit the search results to images, then click “Perform Search.”

ImageSearch

Search results with links to found images will be displayed:

ImageSearch results

Personal Digital Archiving with the iLibrarian

ILibrarian

iLibrarian Blog

How many of us still have photos from our first digital cameras? Can you locate the paper you wrote on your desktop computer five years ago? Maybe your migrations between laptops and phones, across platforms and formats have been seamless, but for the rest of us there is some help. The iLibrarian blogger Ellyssa Kroski has been leading workshops

on personal archiving, and has graciously made some of her techniques available online.  Unfortunately, we can’t throw everything in a shoebox and know that it will be there twenty (or even two!) years down the line. Today’s effective personal archiving is not quite as easy as putting everything on an external hard drive either, but the extra effort is worthwhile.

She covers storage, organization and guidelines for thinking about file formats, in addition to a myriad of other concerns. Be a good steward of your own data with the iLibrarian!

Note: If you are on campus and interested in personal archives you may be interested in the Personal Digital Archiving conference on Thursday, April 12. Jeff Ubois, founder and frequent chair of the Personal Digital Archiving conference held at the Internet Archive will begin at 4 pm in Room 126 LIS (501 E. Daniel, Champaign).

WikiPainting: A place to put your art history skills to work

Still in beta mode, with room to grow, it is surprising the WikiPainting did not exist before. The good news is: it exists now and is growing quickly.

Senecio

Paul Klee's 'Senecio' from WikiPainting

Faceted searching by artist and artworks among other things let you wander the halls of this virtual museum on your own initiative. Explore the evolution of a personal style or the favored subject of an artist throughout time.

This non-profit, online repository for fine art has the ambitious goal of covering all of art history. And we aren’t talking just the canon here, everything from natural pigments on a stonewall in a cave to something a bit beyond MS Paint. Contribute content to WikiPainting if you can. Help it become a community tool for enriching our collective knowledge of art history.

Expanded Google Art Project: or How I Learned to Stop Worrying about Finding High Resolution Images

When Google introduced its Art Project last year, it made a big splash amongst art aficionados, educators, artists, curators, and researchers. There were 1,000 images available from 17 different institutions worldwide, enabling views to zoom in to view incredibly close details. However, almost all of these images were those from Western masters, which invited a flurry of critique to the project. Many of these same art aficionados, educators, artists, curators, and researchers offered ideas on how to enhance the project, and Google listened.

Today, the Art Project includes over 30,000 images from 155 institutions worldwide (street view for 46) , with more on the way. All sizes and types of institutions are embraced, including the White House in Washington D.C. to the National Gallery of Modern Art in Delhi, India.

In addition to adding 29,000 new images to the Art Project, Google has been busy enhancing the tools used to discover and share art. Amit Sood from the Art Project writes:

“Here are a few other new things in the expanded Art Project that you might enjoy:

  • Using completely new tools, called Explore and Discover, you can find artworks by period, artist or type of artwork, displaying works from different museums around the world.
  • Google+ and Hangouts are integrated on the site, enabling you to create even more engaging personal galleries.
  • Street View images are now displayed in finer quality. A specially designed Street View “trolley” took 360-degree images of the interior of selected galleries which were then stitched together, enabling smooth navigation of more than 385 rooms within the museums. You can also explore the gallery interiors directly from within Street View in Google Maps.
  • We now have 46 artworks available with our “gigapixel” photo capturing technology, photographed in extraordinary detail using super high resolution so you can study details of the brushwork and patina that would be impossible to see with the naked eye.
  • An enhanced My Gallery feature lets you select any of the 30,000 artworks—along with your favorite details—to build your own personalized gallery. You can add comments to each painting and share the whole collection with friends and family. (It’s an ideal tool for students.)”

The Art Project works under the auspices of the Google Cultural Institute, which is “building tools that make it simple to tell the stories of our diverse cultural heritage and make them accessible worldwide.” For those of you not so interested in art, the Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory, Yad Vashem Commemoration of the Holocost, Digitized Dead Sea Scrolls, La France en relief, and Le Pavillion de l’Arsenal projects may interest you.

While the Art Project is without a doubt exciting, some of you may be wondering how this competes with your other favorite high resolution database: ARTstor. The main difference is that while Google’s Art Project may be fancier to look at and the images an even higher resolution, viewers are still not able to download images for in class presentations. If you want to show your students what Van Gogh’s brushstrokes looked like, you’ll have to take a screenshot and add it to a PowerPoint (or whatever presentation software you use). ARTstor, however, is much more educator friendly. With tools to share your image collections that don’t involve social media and presentation tools such as the Offline Image Viewer, you’re still bound to ‘wow’ your students. Additionally, ARTstor boasts over one million images in its database verses the 30,000 in the Art Project. That’s about 34x the amount of images (or something, I didn’t go into math for a reason)!

So, to sum up: Google Art Project is now more amazing. ARTstor is still amazing. Happy viewing!

The Lyonel Feininger Archive

Lyonel Feininger : Photographs, 1928-1939

Harvard’s Houghton Library and the Harvard Art Museum’s Lyonel Feininger Archive have collaborated to create an online research microsite presenting a comprehensive collection of Feininger’s largely un-seen photographic works. Harvard holds the majority of Feininger’s photographs, with some 500 photographic prints at the Houghton Library and approximately 18,000 negatives and slides in the Feininger Archive. All of this material has now been digitized and made available through a searchable database, located at the Lyonel Feininger Research Microsite – one of four such microsites created and maintained by Harvard.
The Busch Reisinger Museum at Harvard recently held two exhibitions featuring the work of Lyonel Feininger. The catalog for the photographic exhibition, Lyonel Feininger : photographs, 1928-1939 (Harvard Art Museums, 2011) is now available at the Ricker Library of Architecture and Art. The exhibitions, “Lyonel Feininger: Drawings and Watercolors from the William S. Lieberman Bequest to the Busch-Reisinger Museum” and “Lyonel Feininger: Photographs, 1928–1939″ ran from February 26 to July 17 before traveling abroad. They represented Harvard’s extensive holdings of Feininger’s work, in particular his photographs – which had never before been exhibited.

Lyonel Feininger (1871-1956) is well-known as a painter and an important contributor to the Bauhaus and German modern art. His long-term engagement with photography has never previously been explored. In the exhibition catalog for his photographic work, it is speculated that Feininger did not pursue photography more publicly because of his sons’ enthusiasm for the medium. Both of Feininger’s sons, Andreas and T. Lux made careers as photographers and writers on photography.

Harvard’s Feininger Microsite is the first widely accessible presentation of Feininger’s photography and it represents an enormous asset to Feininger researchers and enthusiasts. The content of the site was compiled and by Nathan J. Timpano (2009–2010 Stefan Engelhorn Curatorial Fellow, Busch-Reisinger Museum) and the commentary and biographical information is drawn from the exhibition catalog organized byLaura Muir (assistant curator, Busch-Reisinger Museum). The site allows users to search the collection by text, title, object number, date range, medium, subject and/or creation place. Additionally, given the low-profile nature of this collection and the presumed unfamiliarity of the user, the site offers an extremely useful feature wherein they can browse characteristic slideshows of prominent subjects within the collection. These include, ‘art documentation’, ‘Bauhaus’, ‘Trips to California’, ‘New England’ and ‘shop windows’ among others. Each of these subject slide shows bears an informational excerpt about the work presented. The site is smartly designed, easy to use, and the photographs are breathtaking.

With the Feininger exhibitions, catalog, and research microsite, Harvard has presented an interesting model where artistic collections, archival resources, and resident experts have been brought together to steward, curate, publish and develop new tools that act as both promotional tools for the museum and research tools for the University.

Dipity timelines

For visual learners, sometimes a timeline can be just the thing to help put history into some sort of context. Dipity, a free digital timeline website who’s mission is to “organize the web’s content by date and time,” allows users to create, share, embed, and collaborate on timelines. These aren’t just any timelines either; they integrate video, audio, images, text, links, social media, location, and timestamps to create something engaging and interactive.

Dipity stands out amongst other timelines, such as Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Heilbrunn Art History Timeline, as it can be customized to represent individual art historical movements, individual artists, or even individual works of art. It is especially useful for those studying social history, as political movements and new stories are often featured. Dipity also features many of the social networking features that many users expect to see, such as the ability to follow, or subscribe to already created timelines, and sharing via twitter, facebook, myspace, digg, and stumbleupon.

Due to its rich media integration and collaborative nature, Dipity is a great tool for students and faculty alike.

dipity

Google Chrome apps for Images

ChromeI never thought I would fall for a web browser, but Google has captured my heart with Chrome. I was at first intrigued by its claims of being the fastest web browser in terms of site loading time, but having used it for a while now I’ve discovered even more time saving features.

Many of you are already familiar with apps for your smart phones, but what about your web browser? Go to the Google Chrome web store, and you’ll find many free apps related to image retrieval, image editing, and even 3D modeling.

Let’s start with image retrieval. In Google Chrome, you can search the web for an image on your hard drive (for example, if you’re not sure what the image is of, or you need a higher resolution image) by simply dragging and dropping that image into the search box at images.google.com. If you don’t want to be bothered to have to go to the Google Images page, download the Chrome extension and simply right click (or ctrl click) on an image to search. The extension only works for images found on the web, however. An alternative extension has been developed by Tineye, which some of you may already be familiar with. While the Google extension will recall web pages that include the image your searched for, as well as pages about the artist, Tineye recalls strictly the image.

Let’s say you found the image you’re looking for, but the color is a bit off. There are a few web-based image editing apps in Chrome, but I like to use the Aviary Image Editor. Aviary Phoenix is a fairly robust piece of free image editing software, and the app is no exception. There are over 30 editing tools, including rotate, brightness/contrast, and sharpen. The app allows you to edit images within the browser, and then either download or share on a social networking site. If you teach with images found online often, this app can help you improve the quality of your images.

To resize and reformat images, you can use the handy Extreme Image Converter. This app allows users to upload an image, convert it to any of 13 different file formats, and specify the size (keeping in mind that it is easier to reduce size than increase size).

If you prefer 3D models to digital images, install 3DTin and start creating your own. It’s a little bit like Google SketchUp, but less robust and more user friendly. When you’re done, you can save your model in the cloud, or export in standard 3D file formats (OBJ, STL).

There are many more apps and extensions available than the ones listed here, and they are either searchable or browsable by category. Enjoy!

Hypercities

For those of you who attended the 2010 GIS fair last November, you heard UCLA’ Dr. Todd Presner speak about his project, Hypercities, and are probably already familiar with what it has to offer. If not, read on.

As described on the GIS fair keynote abstract, “Hypercities is a collaborative digital mapping platform that explores the layered histories of city spaces. Awarded one of the first “digital media and learning” prizes by the MacArthur Foundation/HASTAC in 2008, HyperCities is an interactive, web-based research and teaching environment for authoring and analyzing the cultural, architectural, and urban history of cities.” Using Google Maps and Google Earth, users can go back in time to explore cities of centuries past, analyze how cities change over time, and interact with the maps through social media. The fundamental idea behind HyperCities is that all stories take place somewhere and sometime; they become meaningful when they interact and intersect with other stories.

More information, as well as some “how-to”s can be found at the Hypercities website. To start using this tool, click on “launch Hypercities” at the top. From there, select a city that  you would like to explore, and then choose a map from the menu bar at the right. Users can add as many layers of maps as they want, select the opacity for each map, export metadata, and view ‘collections,’ which are projects that other people are working on with those same maps.

It can be a bit clunky at first, but once you get the hang of it it’s a lot of fun to play around with.

ARTstor Mobile

ARTstor MobileAll 1,000,000+ images from the ARTstor Digital Library are now accessible through iPad, iPhone, and the iPod Touch to registered ARTstor users. ARTstor Mobile provides read-only features such as searching, browsing, zooming, and viewing saved image groups. Also try the new Flashcard View, which allows you to test your knowledge by viewing the image without textual information, and then flipping the image to reveal the image record.  There’s no need to download special software, just go to http://library.artstor.org from your mobile device. ARTstor Mobile is only available through the Safari browser.  Click here for more information.

Image importer for Mac osx 10.6/PowerPoint 2008

If you’re teaching with PowerPoint and spending a lot of time inserting images into your slideshow, this may be the answer for you. While PC users are able to insert groups of images into their PowerPoints through the Photo Album feature, Mac users have had no such equivalent. However, Jeanette Mills, Director of Visual Services at the University of Washington, has developed an application using the Automator tool that will allow Mac users to batch import images into Powerpoint. To access this application, click here and follow the instructions in her blog. The application will insert one images per slide, so if you plan on having multiple images on one slide, this may not be for you.

I’ve tested this out, and it works beautifully. The only requirements are that you are using Mac OSX 10.6 and Powerpoint 2008.

Opening History Portal

Opening HistoryThe Internet can be a Wild West environment, and it can be frustrating to locate related visual resources on a given topic when those resources reside on hundreds of different websites.  The Opening History web portal seeks to make this task less onerous by providing organized access to digital resources pertaining to United States history and culture.  Within this aggregation of resources is a growing body of visual images from a wide range of libraries, museums, and archives. Currently, images are being aggregated from over 600 digital collections on the Internet.  Through a single subject search, you can locate related images from dispersed collections.  Opening History is an extension of the IMLS Digital Collections and Content (IMLS DCC) project, a collaboration among the University of Illinois Library, the Graduate School of Library and Information Science (Center for Informatics Research in Science and Scholarship), and the Institute of Museum and Library Services, a Federal agency that fosters innovation, leadership, and a lifetime of learning.

Beta testing of Shared Shelf software

The University of Illinois Library and the College of Fine and Applied Arts have partnered with ARTstor, the Society of Architectural Historians and seven other colleges and universities on a new initiative called “Shared Shelf” to support the use of digital images in teaching, learning, and research. The other institutional partners include Colby College, Cornell University, Harvard University, Middlebury College, New York University, University of Miami, and Yale University. The project intends to make it practical for institutions to combine images created by individuals, those held by the institution, and those in ARTstor’s database—and to do so without the need for local on-site infrastructure and storage.

Shared Shelf visualization

Components of Shared Shelf

Shared Shelf’s functionality will support the ingest, description, retrieval, and display of images, and enable libraries and scholars at participating institutions to share those images across their own campuses, with other Shared Shelf institutions, and with geographically distributed groups of scholars.  Images are accessed by users through ARTstor’s search and discovery environment, which makes it easy to find, collect, save, share, and send digital images.  Individual users will also be able to submit image content from personal collections to institutional collections in ARTstor.

UI librarians and faculty and staff from FAA and the History Department are currently testing the first beta release of the Shared Shelf software.  The final release of the software is expected in summer 2011.  Click here for more information about this initiative.

(Image from ARTstor.)

Pliny as an annotation tool for images

John Bradley, Senior Analyst for Humanities Computing at King’s College, London, visited the University of Illinois’ Graduate School of Library and Information Science on July 20 and 21 to discuss, share, and demonstrate Pliny—a free, publicly available, open source software for note-taking and annotation of both digital and non-digital materials.  Below is a screenshot illustrating how Pliny can be used to annotate a digital image.  You can find instructions for downloading and installing Pliny here.

The image is the frontispiece of Giambattista Vico’s Scienza Nuova, and Vico points out in his introduction that the image can be interpreted as an allegory of the topics he covers in his text.  In our figure the user has used Pliny to label parts of the image that refer to several of those topics, and has also included a couple of comments about the significance of this image for his/her own study.”

(Image and quotation from Bradley, John. Pliny: A model for digital support of scholarship. Journal of Digital Information, Vol 9, No 1, 2008)

The Digital Image Rights Computator

The Visual Resources Association offers a handy web tool called The Digital Image Rights Computator to “assist the user in assessing the intellectual property status of a specific image documenting a work of art, a designed object, or a portion of the built environment. Understanding the presence or absence of rights in the various aspects of a given image will allow the user to make informed decisions regarding the intended educational uses of that image.”  The interactive program guides you through a series of questions addressing five variables:

  1. The copyright status of the underlying work represented in the image.
  2. The copyright status of the photographic reproduction.
  3. The specific source from which you have obtained the image under consideration.
  4. Any terms of use or contract that may govern the uses of the image.
  5. The intended use(s) of the image.