Personal Digital Archiving with the iLibrarian

ILibrarian

iLibrarian Blog

How many of us still have photos from our first digital cameras? Can you locate the paper you wrote on your desktop computer five years ago? Maybe your migrations between laptops and phones, across platforms and formats have been seamless, but for the rest of us there is some help. The iLibrarian blogger Ellyssa Kroski has been leading workshops

on personal archiving, and has graciously made some of her techniques available online.  Unfortunately, we can’t throw everything in a shoebox and know that it will be there twenty (or even two!) years down the line. Today’s effective personal archiving is not quite as easy as putting everything on an external hard drive either, but the extra effort is worthwhile.

She covers storage, organization and guidelines for thinking about file formats, in addition to a myriad of other concerns. Be a good steward of your own data with the iLibrarian!

Note: If you are on campus and interested in personal archives you may be interested in the Personal Digital Archiving conference on Thursday, April 12. Jeff Ubois, founder and frequent chair of the Personal Digital Archiving conference held at the Internet Archive will begin at 4 pm in Room 126 LIS (501 E. Daniel, Champaign).

WikiPainting: A place to put your art history skills to work

Still in beta mode, with room to grow, it is surprising the WikiPainting did not exist before. The good news is: it exists now and is growing quickly.

Senecio

Paul Klee's 'Senecio' from WikiPainting

Faceted searching by artist and artworks among other things let you wander the halls of this virtual museum on your own initiative. Explore the evolution of a personal style or the favored subject of an artist throughout time.

This non-profit, online repository for fine art has the ambitious goal of covering all of art history. And we aren’t talking just the canon here, everything from natural pigments on a stonewall in a cave to something a bit beyond MS Paint. Contribute content to WikiPainting if you can. Help it become a community tool for enriching our collective knowledge of art history.

Expanded Google Art Project: or How I Learned to Stop Worrying about Finding High Resolution Images

When Google introduced its Art Project last year, it made a big splash amongst art aficionados, educators, artists, curators, and researchers. There were 1,000 images available from 17 different institutions worldwide, enabling views to zoom in to view incredibly close details. However, almost all of these images were those from Western masters, which invited a flurry of critique to the project. Many of these same art aficionados, educators, artists, curators, and researchers offered ideas on how to enhance the project, and Google listened.

Today, the Art Project includes over 30,000 images from 155 institutions worldwide (street view for 46) , with more on the way. All sizes and types of institutions are embraced, including the White House in Washington D.C. to the National Gallery of Modern Art in Delhi, India.

In addition to adding 29,000 new images to the Art Project, Google has been busy enhancing the tools used to discover and share art. Amit Sood from the Art Project writes:

“Here are a few other new things in the expanded Art Project that you might enjoy:

  • Using completely new tools, called Explore and Discover, you can find artworks by period, artist or type of artwork, displaying works from different museums around the world.
  • Google+ and Hangouts are integrated on the site, enabling you to create even more engaging personal galleries.
  • Street View images are now displayed in finer quality. A specially designed Street View “trolley” took 360-degree images of the interior of selected galleries which were then stitched together, enabling smooth navigation of more than 385 rooms within the museums. You can also explore the gallery interiors directly from within Street View in Google Maps.
  • We now have 46 artworks available with our “gigapixel” photo capturing technology, photographed in extraordinary detail using super high resolution so you can study details of the brushwork and patina that would be impossible to see with the naked eye.
  • An enhanced My Gallery feature lets you select any of the 30,000 artworks—along with your favorite details—to build your own personalized gallery. You can add comments to each painting and share the whole collection with friends and family. (It’s an ideal tool for students.)”

The Art Project works under the auspices of the Google Cultural Institute, which is “building tools that make it simple to tell the stories of our diverse cultural heritage and make them accessible worldwide.” For those of you not so interested in art, the Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory, Yad Vashem Commemoration of the Holocost, Digitized Dead Sea Scrolls, La France en relief, and Le Pavillion de l’Arsenal projects may interest you.

While the Art Project is without a doubt exciting, some of you may be wondering how this competes with your other favorite high resolution database: ARTstor. The main difference is that while Google’s Art Project may be fancier to look at and the images an even higher resolution, viewers are still not able to download images for in class presentations. If you want to show your students what Van Gogh’s brushstrokes looked like, you’ll have to take a screenshot and add it to a PowerPoint (or whatever presentation software you use). ARTstor, however, is much more educator friendly. With tools to share your image collections that don’t involve social media and presentation tools such as the Offline Image Viewer, you’re still bound to ‘wow’ your students. Additionally, ARTstor boasts over one million images in its database verses the 30,000 in the Art Project. That’s about 34x the amount of images (or something, I didn’t go into math for a reason)!

So, to sum up: Google Art Project is now more amazing. ARTstor is still amazing. Happy viewing!

NGA Images

Copyright can seem like a real quagmire sometimes. What images can I use without messy repercussions? Is someone going to sue me? What is open access? What is fair use?

Rubens Peale with a Geranium

Rubens Peale with a Geranium by Rembrandt Peals

Well, I’ve got good news. The National Gallery of Art has a collection of images you can reproduce without fear, for any use. Over 20,000, high-resolution, open access images are at your disposal. For free! You can be sitting pretty like our pal over here, with your polished, professional, and perfectly legal presentation.

Copyright currently covers a work until 70 years after the creator’s death. That is the simple version though. I mean, really simple. A more nuanced approach to copyright can be found on April 9 at the Savvy Researcher Workshop titled: Practical Copyright: Considerations for Teaching and Research.

In addition to being open access, NGA Images allows users to browse, search, share, save, and download images. The user-friendly site has also set up it’s own featured image collections, including a folder of “frequently requested” images such as Vermeer’s “Woman Holding a Balance.”

You’re probably thinking that this can’t possibly get any better. But it can. NGA also includes a reproduction guide in it’s help section for those of you publishing with images. Including this document when you send images to you publisher will help to ensure maximum image quality, making you and your publication shine.

Explore and enjoy!

Historic Detroit

While I’ve never visited Detroit, browsing through the 180 galleries of buildings and monuments on Historic Detroit makes it seem as familiar to me as my own hometown.

The Alexander Macomb Monument is unveiled in 1908. Photo from the Burton Historical Collection.

 

Founded in June 2011 by Dan Austin, author of “Lost Detroit: Stories Behind the Motor City’s Majestic Ruins” and former writer, photographer, researcher and webmaster behind the Detroit history site BuildingsofDetroit.com, Historic Detroit serves as a collaborative platform for users to share images and memories of Detroit’s architecture.

Visitors to the site can either search or browse through by place, or sort their results by architect. All contributors to the site maintain full rights on their submissions.

Closer to Van Eyck: Rediscovering the Ghent Altarpiece

If you liked Google’s Art Project but found yourself disappointed that it didn’t include the Ghent Altarpiece, you may have a psychic connection with the Getty Foundation. Like the Art Project, “Closer to Van Eyck…” offers users extreme close up views of the work. The website presents the results from “Lasting Support,” an interdisciplinary research project aiming to assess the structural condition of the Ghent Altarpiece. In addition to high resolution images, users may also view the surface beneath the paint via infrared reflectography (IRR) and x-radiography. Read more about project Lasting Support here.

T. Enami and Japanese photography in the Meiji / Taisho Era

T. Enami. The Tea Pickers. ca. 1905-1920

While cleaning out the Visual Resources Center this past summer, I came across a gorgeous set of  hand-painted lantern slides. The subject matter was Japanese landscapes and everyday scenes, but beyond that there was no information about who the artist was, when these slides were created, or where they may have come from. I wanted to digitize them, but first I needed more information. These slides remained in the back of my mind for the better part of 6 months, until yesterday when I used Tineye and stumbled upon a goldmine.

Flickr user Okinawa_Soba has digitized and made available hundreds of images made by

T. Enami. Mount Fuji and Boatmen in the Early Morning Light. On the Shore of Lake Yamanaka. Ca.1907.

T. Enami, a Japanese photographer active ca. 1892-1929. Scanned from original lantern slides, prints, stereoviews, and postcards, the collection is organized into sets by either medium (stereoviews, halftone, etc.) or subject matter (post 1923 Japan, squatting geisha, etc.). While the Flickr site is informative, with each set and image accompanied by a description, Okinawa_Soba points viewers to a website he created focused on the life and work of T. Enami. A lot of the text from the Flickr collection is duplicated from the website (or visa-versa), though the website seems to be more comprehensive in terms of information about Enami’s life and studio. One caveat is that it is difficult to determine the source of this information.

If you’ve gone through both the Flickr collection and website and still find yourself wanting more T. Enami, Okinawa_Soba directs users to collections at the bottom of the T. Enami collection on Flickr. It is explained, however, that many of the images are not posted on line or may be wrongly attributed.

All images are available for non-commercial use, with proper attribution. If you’d like to see some of the lantern slides in person, stop by the Visual Resources Center in 210a architecture!

Wiki Loves Art Nouveau

the interior of the Museum of Applied Arts in Budapest taken by Csaba Attila Kontar

Wiki Loves Art Nouveau is a collaboration between Wiki Loves Monuments and Europeana, in which crowd-sourced photo submissions are paired with informational content to create an interactive online exhibition that explores the Art Nouveau movement. Europeana sponsored an Art Nouveau category in the Wiki Loves Monuments photo contest, and from a pool of 2,600 submissions viewed 16,000 times by 700 voters, the winning image of the interior of the Museum of Applied Arts in Budapest taken by Csaba Attila Kontar was selected. The winning image along with forty other highly ranked photographs and an additional ten selected by a panel of European editors have been combined to create this online exhibition.The exhibition explores the Art Nouveau movement through four thematic micro exhibits, three of which are format based and one that features supplemental images and thematic exploration selected by the editors. The formats explored include exteriors, interiors, and details creating an over-arching emphasis on the way that technological innovation enabled artists, architects and designers to pursue unified exteriors, interiors, and decorative elements. Attention is paid to recurring design motifs drawn from nature and the gravitation towards undulating non-linear elements as a rejection of the existing neoclassical conventions.

The exhibition is smartly structured – it provides a thorough introduction to the style with ample illustration that explains the movements theoretical substance while allowing users unfamiliar with Art Nouveau to grasp its aesthetic execution. At the same time, the structured presentation of the images and text creates a systematic argument for the cohesiveness of the style and the thoroughness with which it was applied in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The exhibition focuses on Art Nouveau as a stylistic break with tradition and a reaction against convention visible in everything from its non-geometric architecture to the use of gold decoration and lighting to evoke a whimsical other-worldliness. The exhibition manages to stress the hallmarks of the style in a structured and systematic way without reducing it to a formula. For a more comprehensive history and exploration of the style, see Europeana’s other Art Nouveau virtual exhibition

.

year in review / happy holidays

Santas at the Santa Claus School, Albion, N.Y.

Arbus, Diane, Santas at the Santa Claus School, Albion, N.Y., 1964.

It’s been a busy year for the Visual Resources Center, and as we prepare to leave campus for the holidays I’d like to take some time to reflect upon some of the new images and services available not only to the College of Fine and Applied Arts, but also the campus community.

In February we began to use Shared Shelf, a new image management and cataloging platform that allows the VRC to upload content into ARTstor, a library of digital images. While ARTstor already has over one million images in it’s collection, it’s still not entirely comprehensive for teaching and research needs here in FAA. Since February, the VRC has uploaded almost 4,000 images, including the photography of Diane Arbus and Gordon Parks, works from Asia, the Impressionists, and much more. To browse the collection, simply double click on “FAA Teaching Collection” in the institutional collections section of ARTstor’s homepage. We are continuously adding new images, so please let us know if there is something you’d like to see.

The VRC has also been trying to reach out to more potential users in order to improve access to (and information about) digital images. In the fall we debuted our new website, which contains information on everything from accessing our ARTstor collection to digital preservation best practices. Next year we will be working on improving the navigation of the website, making it a more user-friendly and intuitive experience. We’ve also been teaching ARTstor workshops through the library’s Savvy Researcher workshop series, where you can learn about using the database for finding and teaching with images.

Next semester we’ll continue to provide these services, but we are always looking to improve. Be on the lookout for a workshop on finding images (not focused on ARTstor),  an event showcasing digital humanities tools, and possibly a workshop on editing images using free online tools. If there is something specific related to visual resources that you’re interested in learning more about, please don’t hesitate to contact us about it.

I hope you’ve all had a great year as well, and wish you the happiest of holidays.

Your Paintings

Landscape with a Cottage and Stream - unknown

Your Paintings (or rather, ‘their paintings’) is a collaborative project between the BBC and the Public Catalogue Foundation that aspires to digitize and tag every oil painting in the UK National Collections. Currently still in a beta stage, the project anticipates digitizing a total of 200,000 paintings of which it has completed 77,000.

Your Paintings seeks out only those paintings which belong to the National Collection and, for the most part, the site features pieces owned by state and local authorities, Bishop’s palaces, and Oxford and Cambridge colleges. The project has also chosen to restrict its initial digitization efforts to oil, tempera, and acrylic and excludes other paint media like watercolors in order to keep the project at a manageable scale.

In addition to the digitization initiative, Your Paintings also has a crowd-sourced tagging project to increase the ‘findability’ of each image within the site. Users are invited to participate by tagging randomly selected images using four different controlled vocabularies (things, people, places and events). The biographical and historical information included in each record comes from the participating and owning institutions.

The site makes smart use of slideshows, thumbnails, transitions, drop-down text and multi-media features like hyperlinks, social-media, videos and maps in order to create a site that looks elegant and communicates a great deal of information without being busy or text-heavy. The images are high quality and can be viewed in a pop-out larger format view.

Subject sorting in Google Images: Because Google hasn’t mastered mind-reading yet

In case you aren’t already aware, Google Images has a ‘Sort by Subject’ feature on its results page – it’s the kind of left-margin item that can go easily unnoticed, but for the utility it provides, it should 80 pt. font and flashing. When you conduct a Google images search the default display (bolded and in red) is ‘All results’. The alternative view is ‘By Subject’ which breaks down your results into the most popular images associated with your search. It’s the ideal tool for those, “I can picture it, I just don’t remember what it’s called” searches.

Try it out, but more importantly keep it in mind for those moments when you really need Google to do your remembering for you.

The Lyonel Feininger Archive

Lyonel Feininger : Photographs, 1928-1939

Harvard’s Houghton Library and the Harvard Art Museum’s Lyonel Feininger Archive have collaborated to create an online research microsite presenting a comprehensive collection of Feininger’s largely un-seen photographic works. Harvard holds the majority of Feininger’s photographs, with some 500 photographic prints at the Houghton Library and approximately 18,000 negatives and slides in the Feininger Archive. All of this material has now been digitized and made available through a searchable database, located at the Lyonel Feininger Research Microsite – one of four such microsites created and maintained by Harvard.
The Busch Reisinger Museum at Harvard recently held two exhibitions featuring the work of Lyonel Feininger. The catalog for the photographic exhibition, Lyonel Feininger : photographs, 1928-1939 (Harvard Art Museums, 2011) is now available at the Ricker Library of Architecture and Art. The exhibitions, “Lyonel Feininger: Drawings and Watercolors from the William S. Lieberman Bequest to the Busch-Reisinger Museum” and “Lyonel Feininger: Photographs, 1928–1939” ran from February 26 to July 17 before traveling abroad. They represented Harvard’s extensive holdings of Feininger’s work, in particular his photographs – which had never before been exhibited.

Lyonel Feininger (1871-1956) is well-known as a painter and an important contributor to the Bauhaus and German modern art. His long-term engagement with photography has never previously been explored. In the exhibition catalog for his photographic work, it is speculated that Feininger did not pursue photography more publicly because of his sons’ enthusiasm for the medium. Both of Feininger’s sons, Andreas and T. Lux made careers as photographers and writers on photography.

Harvard’s Feininger Microsite is the first widely accessible presentation of Feininger’s photography and it represents an enormous asset to Feininger researchers and enthusiasts. The content of the site was compiled and by Nathan J. Timpano (2009–2010 Stefan Engelhorn Curatorial Fellow, Busch-Reisinger Museum) and the commentary and biographical information is drawn from the exhibition catalog organized byLaura Muir (assistant curator, Busch-Reisinger Museum). The site allows users to search the collection by text, title, object number, date range, medium, subject and/or creation place. Additionally, given the low-profile nature of this collection and the presumed unfamiliarity of the user, the site offers an extremely useful feature wherein they can browse characteristic slideshows of prominent subjects within the collection. These include, ‘art documentation’, ‘Bauhaus’, ‘Trips to California’, ‘New England’ and ‘shop windows’ among others. Each of these subject slide shows bears an informational excerpt about the work presented. The site is smartly designed, easy to use, and the photographs are breathtaking.

With the Feininger exhibitions, catalog, and research microsite, Harvard has presented an interesting model where artistic collections, archival resources, and resident experts have been brought together to steward, curate, publish and develop new tools that act as both promotional tools for the museum and research tools for the University.

The Doodle Revolution

If you ever find yourself doodling during class or in a meeting, don’t feel

17 Ideas for Content Creation, by Veronica Maria Jarski

guilty. According to Sunni Brown, it’s one of the most productive things you can be doing. An avid visual literacy advocate, Sunni is best known for large-scale strategic doodles and Gamestorming, a book that outlines visual thinking techniques for business. She is also a TED speaker and conversationalist.

The Doodle Revolution website features examples of large scale doodles done organizations such as the Rockefeller Foundation and TEDGlobal 2011 in Edinburgh, as well as a toolkit, information on bootcamps and webinars, and a doodle showcase. I found the toolkit to be especially informative, as it contains lists of books, videos, articles, and slides that direct users to more information on visual thinking and visual literacy. While I have been thinking of visual literacy in terms of interpreting meaning from an object that someone else, such as Jacob Riis, has created, I neglected to realize that one’s own ‘doodles’ can be important forms of scholarship and communication.

The History of the World in 100 Objects

Two-Headed Serpent, detail
While doing some research earlier today, I came across a fascinating project undertaken by the British Museum called “The History of the World in 100 Objects.” Many of you may already be familiar with this project, as I’ve come to find out the results of this project were broadcast on the BBC throughout 2010 as well as in a book that was published a mere 4 days ago.

For those of you not familiar with this project, its goal was to tell the history of the world through 100 objects found in the British Museum’s sprawling collections. Taking 100 curators 4 years to complete, the results include objects that embody themes ranging to political power to everyday life. To coincide with the project, the public was invited to share stories of objects that hold significance to them.

100 objects to tell the history of the world is a daunting task to be sure, but it raises some important questions. Why is one object more important than another? Are aesthetics or usefulness considered more important? What are these objects telling us now that may not have been appreciated in its time?

If you’d like to start your own “100 Objects” project, you can do so in ARTstor by creating image groups. If you’d like to make this a class assigment, you can do so by either creating a folder that your students can edit, or creating a folder that has student folders enabled.

More resources:

Stuff that Defines Us by Carol Vogel

History of the World in 100 Objects Slideshow by the New York Times

copyright articles and resources

An unfortunate part of working with digital collections and other visual resources is dealing with copyright. While we can’t answer specific questions, we can provide you with some resources that may help steer you in the right direction. Here are a couple:

Recently Nancy Sims, the copyright program librarian at the University of Minnesota, was on campus to talk about copyright and academia. As both a lawyer and a librarian, her voice on such matters is highly valued. Back in May of this year she was interviewed by Jennifer Howard of the Chronicle of Higher Education, with the resulting article being called “What you don’t know about copyright, but should.” The article reads as a bulleted list of pointers about copyright, and provides much food for thought.

Not too long after the Chronicle of Higher Education published the article about Nancy Sims, it came out with another copyright article written by Jeffrey R. Young about fair use in education. Called “Pushing back against legal threats by putting fair use forward,” it features two scholars at American University—Patricia Aufderheide, a film-studies professor, and Peter Jaszi, a law professor. The two professors recently published a book titled Reclaiming Fair Use: How to Put Balance Back in Copyright, which deals with what they call misperceptions about the fair-use rules of U.S. copyright law. This is not the first time Aufderheide and Jaszi have worked together;  since 1996 they have been researching fair use and publishing guidelines for different types of creative work, such as documentary filmmaking. While I haven’t read the book, it sounds like it could be a great read on a complex topic.

Dipity timelines

For visual learners, sometimes a timeline can be just the thing to help put history into some sort of context. Dipity, a free digital timeline website who’s mission is to “organize the web’s content by date and time,” allows users to create, share, embed, and collaborate on timelines. These aren’t just any timelines either; they integrate video, audio, images, text, links, social media, location, and timestamps to create something engaging and interactive.

Dipity stands out amongst other timelines, such as Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Heilbrunn Art History Timeline, as it can be customized to represent individual art historical movements, individual artists, or even individual works of art. It is especially useful for those studying social history, as political movements and new stories are often featured. Dipity also features many of the social networking features that many users expect to see, such as the ability to follow, or subscribe to already created timelines, and sharing via twitter, facebook, myspace, digg, and stumbleupon.

Due to its rich media integration and collaborative nature, Dipity is a great tool for students and faculty alike.

dipity

Ara Pacis Augustae collection

Developed by Charles S. Rhyne at Reed College in conjunction with Reed’s Visual Resources Center and Web Support Services, the Ara Pacis Augustae collection seeks to “to make available a more comprehensive body of images of the Ara Pacis than previously available in any print or web publication.” According to Professor Rhyne, “the Ara Pacis Augustae is a complex masterpiece, with elaborate reliefs including more than a hundred figures and voluminous vegetation filled with the details of nature. It is also a much damaged and reconstructed monument, making it important to distinguish original from later portions and more recent changes. This web site attempts to provide in-depth visual documentation in support of the in-depth scholarly publications that have so enriched our understanding of Augustan art and society.’

The site is neatly organized into different views of the altar, such as aerial views, interior walls, and public approach. Also included are several different publications detailing the Ara Pacis. The site is copyrighted by Reed College and Charles Rhyne, but indicates that images images and text are available under fair use guidelines.

Overall, this is a well organized and thorough exploration of one of the most iconic architectural monuments in Western history. However, users must use the images within the site, as they cannot be downloaded.

Tourist photos from pre-Revolutionary Moscow

For all you Russian history aficionados out there, this collection is a fascinating look at Moscow in 1909. Taken by journalist Murray Howe on an exhibition tour of American champion trotting horses, 77 of the 400 photos taken were digitized and made available via Flickr by Howe’s great-grandson, Andrew Howe V.

The Moscow Times writes of the photographs, “His photographs of pedestrians, street venders and aristocrats are rare glimpses of everyday life before the upheavals of World War I and the Bolshevik Revolution — and sparked huge interest in Russia among history buffs and local museums.”

While downloading images from the Flickr site is currently disabled, those interested in using the images can contact Andrew Howe at ahowe@cranewoods.com.

Google Chrome apps for Images

ChromeI never thought I would fall for a web browser, but Google has captured my heart with Chrome. I was at first intrigued by its claims of being the fastest web browser in terms of site loading time, but having used it for a while now I’ve discovered even more time saving features.

Many of you are already familiar with apps for your smart phones, but what about your web browser? Go to the Google Chrome web store, and you’ll find many free apps related to image retrieval, image editing, and even 3D modeling.

Let’s start with image retrieval. In Google Chrome, you can search the web for an image on your hard drive (for example, if you’re not sure what the image is of, or you need a higher resolution image) by simply dragging and dropping that image into the search box at images.google.com. If you don’t want to be bothered to have to go to the Google Images page, download the Chrome extension and simply right click (or ctrl click) on an image to search. The extension only works for images found on the web, however. An alternative extension has been developed by Tineye, which some of you may already be familiar with. While the Google extension will recall web pages that include the image your searched for, as well as pages about the artist, Tineye recalls strictly the image.

Let’s say you found the image you’re looking for, but the color is a bit off. There are a few web-based image editing apps in Chrome, but I like to use the Aviary Image Editor. Aviary Phoenix is a fairly robust piece of free image editing software, and the app is no exception. There are over 30 editing tools, including rotate, brightness/contrast, and sharpen. The app allows you to edit images within the browser, and then either download or share on a social networking site. If you teach with images found online often, this app can help you improve the quality of your images.

To resize and reformat images, you can use the handy Extreme Image Converter. This app allows users to upload an image, convert it to any of 13 different file formats, and specify the size (keeping in mind that it is easier to reduce size than increase size).

If you prefer 3D models to digital images, install 3DTin and start creating your own. It’s a little bit like Google SketchUp, but less robust and more user friendly. When you’re done, you can save your model in the cloud, or export in standard 3D file formats (OBJ, STL).

There are many more apps and extensions available than the ones listed here, and they are either searchable or browsable by category. Enjoy!

Ando Hiroshige Prints

Odawara

Odawara - the tenth station in "The Fifty-Three Stations of the Tokaido"( Hoeido edition 1831 - 1834)

The Woodblock Prints of Ando Hiroshige is an enthusiast-maintained site that reproduces the woodblock prints of Ando Hiroshige (1797 – 1858).

The site combines digital images of Hiroshige’s prints with descriptions, dates, and abundant contextual material including primary source excerpts, maps, encyclopedic entries, book passages, and comparable works by other artists. The site presents a rich resource on the life and work of Ando Hiroshige and can be accessed freely online by anyone.

A timeline of updates made to the site creates a timeline of the site’s development, while the main page of the site presents directories of Hiroshige’s prints and the reference material used in constructing the site. The reference section includes a bibliography, a guide to searching for Japanese prints online, a digest of links that are related or useful to Hiroshige, a breakdown of the dimensions of different prints, essays, biographies, and more. The prints are organized by series (which usually explore a single subject) as well as format and theme.

The site design is simple and straight forward, if text-heavy at times, but it manages to present an enormous amount of material and a wealth of resources related to Hiroshige’s prints. The site is a valuable resource for Hiroshige enthusiasts and scholars alike and sets a fantastic example for similar projects.

‘Friends of art’ seeks to crowdsource the history of art

Gustav Klimt's "Farmhouse with Birch Trees"
“Farmhouse with Birch Trees” by Gustav Klimt (1903)

‘Friends of art’ (FOA) self identifies as, “a young community of art enthusiasts who are re-writing art history”. Currently in the beta stage, FOA invites users to contribute and curate content about artists, movements, and individual pieces. Users can register with the site to create a profile, build personal collections, and designate favorite artists, pieces, and movements.

In addition to using the site to develop and expand your own knowledge, as a FOA user, your activity is reflected in the records. When a piece has been added to a user’s collection, that collection is cited in the record as a way of capturing and communicating to other users the way someone else responded to or learned from the work. In this way, FOA creates a kind of social network that revolves around the art presented and discussed on the site.

Each record invites comments, revisions, tagging, and sharing as means of involving the user, but they also include images of the piece and the artist as well as basic information about the piece. The site pairs a spare aesthetic with a proliferation of images in order to create a highly browsable environment. The records also offer a ‘palette’ for each work, where the piece’s color palette is characterized, distilled and presented as a collection of 10 different shades. The site also includes search functions and a timeline of artistic movements. The breadth, depth, and variety of the resources and functionality of FOA strike a balance that makes it easy for users to search, browse, and interact with art history in a new way.

Visual Resource Center debuts website

Ever feel like you’ve run out of internet to browse? You’ve checked your email, gotten up to date on your Facebook news, and did the latest NY Times Crossword online. What next?

Hop on over to the new Visual Resources Center’s website and learn all about ARTstor, copyright, and digital images. Our new site offers links to ARTstor trainings and handouts for your convenience, as well as information on finding, creating, editing, presenting, and preserving images. In addition, visitors to the site can peruse links related to copyright information, download workflow automator tools, and discover other new resources such as Tineye. You can even “like” us on Facebook to have this blog in your newsfeed, or visit our Youtube channel where we will be posting video tutorials (still a work in progress).

Feel free to leave comments with suggestions for other resources to include on the site. It is meant to be a useful resource for the campus community, and we are always looking to improve.

the Memory of the Netherlands

Welcome back, students, faculty, and staff! We hope your fall semester is off to a delightful start.

For those of you with an interest in Netherlandish history, I’m about to make your week even more delightful. The Memory of the Netherlands is a self-described “gigantic digital treasury,” full of information about the Dutch past. Offering hundreds of thousands of digital images, recordings, film footage, and texts, the Memory site organizes this wealth of information into several exhibitions, collections, and themes.

While you’ll still find images of windmills, wooden shoes and tulips are few and far between. Rather, the Memory site provides well thought out exhibitions that explore life in Holland today and themes that range from religion to cartoons.

While the Memory site is largely in English and searchable using English keywords, information about the images and other objects are in Dutch.

Yale’s museums, archives, and libraries announce open access policy

Just as the semester draws to a close and summer is on the horizon, scholars and art

Roomy by the Sea, by Edward Hopper

Edward Hopper, "Rooms by the Sea," 1851. Yale University Art Gallery

aficionados have another reason to celebrate: Yale University has announced an open access policy for its collections. Gone are the days of licensing images from Yale or having restrictions put on their use; interested parties can now use these collections at will. Yale is the first ivy league university to make its collections openly accessible, and already has over 250,000 images available from its museums and galleries. For more information and some great quotes from Yale staff regarding this decision, please read the artdaily article.

New features in ARTstor

For those of you who are frequent fliers at ARTstor.org, you may have noticed a few new features recently. If not, don’t fret: you can read about it here.

One of my personal wishes that has just now come true is the ability to choose the number of results displayed per page. 

This makes browsing the images related to your favorite artist or topic much easier. This feature is available in the center of the beige column on your results page (where you can also narrow your results, sort, and navigate between pages)

Also helping to make browsing and finding images easier is the image preview
feature, where one hover over an image and a slightly larger version of that image will appear. This will help you save time, as it eliminates the need to open the image in the image viewer in order to preview it.

In terms of image organization, users can now create descriptions of image groups, nest folders, and create folders while creating image groups (instructor level users only). The links will take you to ARTstor’s help section, where these features are explained in detail. ARTstor’s help section is a great place to learn about the different tools and features within the database, so feel free to peruse while you’re there!

Earth as Art

Florida Evreglades

While scientists and engineers at the U.S. Geological Survey’s EROS Data Center, just north of Sioux Falls, South Dakota , collect satellite imagery to document Earth’s natural disasters, they sometimes enjoy the images for their aesthetic beauty as well. The scientists select about 40 of these images for a special exhibit, called “Earth as Art,” at the Library of Congress. The exhibit is now in its third incarnation, and the latest prints just recently arrived in Washington, D.C. to begin their one-year stint on display. All of the Earth as Art images are available at the link above, and can be downloaded for personal or commercial use. According to Dirk Lammers from the Assicoated Press, some of the images have made it into German coffee table books and neckties.

Historian’s Eye

The Historian’s Eye, created by Yale University professor Matthew Frye Jacobson, is a collection of over 1,000 digital images and audio archive addressing contemporary issues. Started in 2009 to document the historic moment of President Obama’s inauguration through photographs and interviews, the collection has since evolved to include  images related to the “2008 economic collapse and its fallout, two wars, the raucous politics of healthcare reform, the emergence of a new right-wing formation in opposition to Obama, the politics of immigration, Wall Street reform, street protests of every stripe, the BP oil spill, and the seeming escalation of anti-Muslim sentiment nationwide.” According to the project’s creator, the Historian’s Eye seeks to “trace the fate of “our better history,” as the nation faces unprecedented challenges with a president at the helm who is fully inspirational to some, palpably unnerving to others.  In addition to catching this moment like a firefly in a mason jar, the project seeks to encourage a new relationship to history itself—a mental habit of apprehending the past in the present and history-in-the-making.” In addition to viewing Jacobson’s images on the Historian’s Eye website, users are encouraged to participate in this project by contributing to the Historian’s Eye Flickr group. This is a fantastic collaborative resource for those interested in exploring contemporary issues and documenting history as it happens.

Center for Multimedia Excellence media survey

If you haven’t filled out the Center for Multimedia Excellence’s campus media survey yet, what are you waiting for? It takes 5-10 minutes, and the results will help to improve campus media accessibility, management, and preservation. You may remember reading about this through a Mass Mail sent by the Vice Chancellor of Research, but just in case you don’t, it’s re-posted below.

“To: Faculty and Staff:

The Data Stewardship Initiative and the Center for Multimedia Excellence are working jointly to identify multimedia collections to better understand management and preservation requirements on campus. The groups will contact faculty and staff to help the campus more clearly understand the needs of researchers, multimedia producers and archivists.

We ask that you participate in these efforts by responding to a brief online survey . This survey seeks to identify collections of audio, film, video, and still images of value for research, instructional, and outreach purposes.

A more detailed census of media collections will follow, conducted through interviews and visits to buildings across campus by students from the Graduate School of Library and Information Science. In addition, the Data Stewardship Initiative will conduct a second survey focused on non-media based research data holdings on campus later this spring.

The Data Stewardship Initiative consists of the University Library, Office of the Chief Information Officer, Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research, and other campus stakeholders. It was created in response to the Stewarding Excellence at Illinois report that recommended that the campus develop a baseline understanding of the activities and needs for data services, curation, and stewardship. Details are available here.

The Center for Multimedia Excellence, comprised of campus multimedia professionals, seeks to identify individuals and campus units that hold digital and analog media collections in order to develop a comprehensive strategy for the preservation of media used for research and non-research purposes. Details are available here.

These efforts are vital to the University’s research, education, and public engagement missions. Increasingly, funding agencies such as the National Science Foundation are requiring grant recipients to better manage and provide access to data generated by projects.

Even when not required, long-term data storage and accessibility are useful to researchers who generate data, as well as to scholars who later use the data in their own work. As a major research university, we must identify ways to improve the ability of our researchers to access and store data, and we must develop a comprehensive strategy to preserve and share our rich multimedia collections here at Illinois.”

Hypercities

For those of you who attended the 2010 GIS fair last November, you heard UCLA’ Dr. Todd Presner speak about his project, Hypercities, and are probably already familiar with what it has to offer. If not, read on.

As described on the GIS fair keynote abstract, “Hypercities is a collaborative digital mapping platform that explores the layered histories of city spaces. Awarded one of the first “digital media and learning” prizes by the MacArthur Foundation/HASTAC in 2008, HyperCities is an interactive, web-based research and teaching environment for authoring and analyzing the cultural, architectural, and urban history of cities.” Using Google Maps and Google Earth, users can go back in time to explore cities of centuries past, analyze how cities change over time, and interact with the maps through social media. The fundamental idea behind HyperCities is that all stories take place somewhere and sometime; they become meaningful when they interact and intersect with other stories.

More information, as well as some “how-to”s can be found at the Hypercities website. To start using this tool, click on “launch Hypercities” at the top. From there, select a city that  you would like to explore, and then choose a map from the menu bar at the right. Users can add as many layers of maps as they want, select the opacity for each map, export metadata, and view ‘collections,’ which are projects that other people are working on with those same maps.

It can be a bit clunky at first, but once you get the hang of it it’s a lot of fun to play around with.

Archivision now available campus-wide through ARTstor

Notre-Dame-du-Haut, Chapelle Notre-Dame-du-Haut de Ronchamp

Formerly available only to the faculty and students of the UI Architecture Department, the University Library has purchased a campus wide subscription for Archivision.  The Archivision Digital Research Library is currently comprised of 47,000 images of architecture, archaeological sites, gardens, parks and works of art with broad appeal in humanities teaching. Digital images in Archivision offers a mix of historic and contemporary material.

This great resource is now available to anyone affiliated with the University of Illinois’ Urbana and Chicago campuses.  Go to http://www.artstor.org/index.shtml and click the “Go” button to enter the ARTstor institutional collectionsARTstor Digital Library.  ARTstor will recognize your UI affiliation and you will see a drop down menu in the center column of the page called Institutional Collections.  You can access the base module of Archivision or any of the additional five Archivision modules from this menu.

Vintage Fashion Online

Move over ModCloth, for those interested in vintage fashion, the London College of Fashion’s Woolmark Company Collection has added over 2,000 newly digitized images of vintage fashion to its existing 2,500. These images can be seen via VADS. The description below is from Amy Robinson of VADS:

From catwalk to high street: vintage fashions go online

Nina Ricci, Guy Laroche, and Yves St. Laurent are just some of the top designers making up a veritable who’s who of fashion at the London College of Fashion’s Woolmark Company Collection. These ‘cool’ wool fashions may no longer be on the catwalk but they can be seen online via VADS

This week over 2000 newly digitised images have been launched online which complement these vintage fashions by key couturiers. These newly digitised images include examples from the ready-to-wear market by manufacturers such as British Home Stores, Berkertex, Windsmoor, Susan Small, and Marks & Spencer, as well as including more examples by top designers such as Mary Quant and Christian Dior.

The black and white photographs date from the 1940’s through to the early 1980’s and capture both the fashion of the time and the style of photography.  The press releases, which in some cases are still attached to the photographs, give additional information about the garments, designers, manufacturers, photographers and any points of interest reflecting the promotional style and language of the time.  All of the images were generously donated to the London College of Fashion from The International Wool Secretariat, now The Woolmark Company.

VADS now provides access to over 4,800 images from the Woolmark Company collection, which complements a number of other London College of Fashion collections already available online including its College Archive, Paper Patterns Collection, Cordwainer’s Shoe Collection, and Gala Cosmetics Archive.

For more information about the London College of Fashion’s Woolmark Company collection see http://www.vads.ac.uk/collections/LCFWOOL.html

VADS offers over 120,000 fully cross-searchable images which are free to use and copyright cleared for learning, teaching, and research.

For more information about VADS collections, see http://www.vads.ac.uk/collections or contact VADS at info@vads.ac.uk / 01252 892723

To keep up to date with VADS news, follow their blog.

CITES Teaching with technology forum

For anyone interested in finding and using digital images for teaching or research, there is a “brown bag” lunchtime talk coming up this Wednesday (the 23rd of February) that will be discussing ARTstor. The information is as follows:

Teaching with Technology Brown Bag Forum–Wednesday, February 23 (12-1pm) at 23 Illini Hall

All Things Images: Using ARTstor for Teaching and Research, Presented by: Sarah Christensen, Visual Resources, and Anne D. Hedeman, Art History

With the need for digital images becoming more prevalent in classrooms, ARTstor can be a useful resource in finding, organizing, sharing, and presenting these images. As a digital image library, ARTstor contains images from a wide variety of disciplines outside of art, so don’t let the name fool you! Sarah Christensen will discuss how to make the features of ARTstor work for you, while Anne D. Hedeman will demonstrate how she utilizes ARTstor in her Compass course site.

If you can’t attend, the talk will be recorded and posted online shortly after. That link will be posted here as well.

 

Hope you can make it!

ARTstor Mobile

ARTstor MobileAll 1,000,000+ images from the ARTstor Digital Library are now accessible through iPad, iPhone, and the iPod Touch to registered ARTstor users. ARTstor Mobile provides read-only features such as searching, browsing, zooming, and viewing saved image groups. Also try the new Flashcard View, which allows you to test your knowledge by viewing the image without textual information, and then flipping the image to reveal the image record.  There’s no need to download special software, just go to http://library.artstor.org from your mobile device. ARTstor Mobile is only available through the Safari browser.  Click here for more information.

Google Art Project

Google’s new product, Google Art Project, uses it street view technology to allow users to “walk” around museums across the world. 

Museum included in the project are:

  • Alte Nationalgalerie, Berlin – Germany
  • Freer Gallery of Art, Smithsonian, Washington DC – USA
  • The Frick Collection, NYC – USA
  • Gemäldegalerie, Berlin – Germany
  • The Metropolitan Museum of Art, NYC – USA
  • MoMA, The Museum of Modern Art, NYC – USA
  • Museo Reina Sofia, Madrid – Spain
  • Museo Thyssen – Bornemisza, Madrid – Spain
  • Museum Kampa, Prague – Czech Republic
  • National Gallery, London – UK
  • Palace of Versailles – France
  • Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam – The Netherlands
  • The State Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg – Russia
  • State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow – Russia
  • Tate Britain, London – UK
  • Uffizi Gallery, Florence – Italy
  • Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam – The Netherlands

In addition to navigating the museums, users have access to high resolution images of over 1,000 selected paintings from these museums. With the ability to zoom to such an incredible degree, art lovers are able to examine the brushstrokes of each of the 486 artists represented. Below is an example of the detail one can achieve through the Google Art Project (can you guess the painting?):

Starry Night, Van Gogh

The images can’t be downloaded, but if you have a Google account you can “create an artwork collection.” With the collections, users can save and collect views of your favorite artworks, add comments at different zoom levels, and share with other Google users.

For more information on this project, follow the links below:

ABC News

Wall Street Journal

CNN

According to an article from Techradar, Google plans on expanding the project, but the timeline is uncertain.

Images from Gallica Bibliotheque Numerique, Bibliothèque Nationale de France

Gallica Bibliothèque Numerique is the digital initiative of La Bibliothèque nationale de France and contains over 1,00,000 digital objects including books, periodicals, maps, manuscripts, images, sound recordings, and scores. Several search options are available as well as themed exhibitions of digital collections, e.g., Voyages en Italie and Voyages en Afrique. Gallica currently contains over 225,000 images.


Image importer for Mac osx 10.6/PowerPoint 2008

If you’re teaching with PowerPoint and spending a lot of time inserting images into your slideshow, this may be the answer for you. While PC users are able to insert groups of images into their PowerPoints through the Photo Album feature, Mac users have had no such equivalent. However, Jeanette Mills, Director of Visual Services at the University of Washington, has developed an application using the Automator tool that will allow Mac users to batch import images into Powerpoint. To access this application, click here and follow the instructions in her blog. The application will insert one images per slide, so if you plan on having multiple images on one slide, this may not be for you.

I’ve tested this out, and it works beautifully. The only requirements are that you are using Mac OSX 10.6 and Powerpoint 2008.

New ARTstor filtered search

If you’ve been searching for images in ARTstor this morning, you may have noticed that there are now a few extra options to filter your search results page. Click on the tab that says “narrow your results,” and a column will appear on the left side of your screen with classification and geography filters. In addition, a time line will appear at the top of your screen where you can slide the markers to specify an earliest date and a latest date. While these filtering options are available already in the “advanced search” feature, this new interface will help to streamline the simple, quick searches that users utilize most often.

Graphics Atlas

Ever wonder what  the difference is between an engraving and an etching? Graphics Atlas, a project of the Image Permanence Institute, will show you. With this tool, users can compare different printing techniques side by side and learn about the methods used for each technique. In addition, the site features fantastic visual tools such as the ability to zoom in and out, flip the page over, see a side view, and change the light source. The mediums discussed range from pre-photogenic (etchings, mezzotints) to digital.

Rome in a day

The Architecture department at the University of Oregon has developed two useful interactive mapping tools of Rome. The first, the interactive Nolli map of Rome, is a digitization of the 1748 map of Rome by Giambattista Nolli. This map is regarded by scholars as one of the most important historical documents of the city, and through the work of the University of Oregon the public now has access to this work. Users can zoom in and out, as well as add layers such as gardens, pathways, and fountains.

The second project is Imago Urbis: Giuseppe Vasi’s Grand Tour of Rome, which integrates the Nolli map with the work of Nolli’s contemporary, Giuseppe Vasi (1710-1782). Vasi’s detailed documentation of Rome’s buildings and monuments established him as one of the city’s greatest topographers. With this tool users can view Nolli’s map and Vasi’s plates simultaneously, making it easier to imagine Rome in the 18th century. Plates are grouped into 8 days of an itinerary, making the grand tour of Rome accessible from your couch.

ARTstor and the University of Illinois Library Announce Collaboration

ARTstor is collaborating with the University Library at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign to share approximately 9,100 images from a variety of special collections in the ARTstor Digital Library. The collection in ARTstor will consist of images digitized from visual materials held in the University Library, which are relevant to a variety of fields, including Irish political history, theater and costume history, and campus architecture and design. The University Library’s Rare Book & Manuscript Library is the principal repository for early manuscripts and rare books, including three special collections that will be shared in the ARTstor Digital Library. The Collins Collection of Irish Political Cartoons consists of approximately 70 images relating to the political history of Ireland from the late 19th century to the early 20th century; Portraits of Actors, 1720-1920 features nearly 3,500 images of actors and actresses, including studio portraits, images of actors in costume, and illustrations of actors in performance; and the Motley Collection of Theater and Costume Design consists of approximately 5,300 individual items relating to more than 150 stage productions designed by the Motley Group between 1932 and 1976, including costume and set designs, sketches, notes, photographs, prop lists, storyboards, and swatches of fabric.  The University Library will also share its Built Environment Collection, approximately 250 images of primary source materials related to the development of the campus of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

For more detailed information about this collection, visit the University Library (Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) collection page in ARTstor.

Friday diversions

Google’s Keyword Guessing Game is a fun way to think about image indexing, keyword relevancy, and finding images online. The game asks you to think of the keyword that produced the grid of 20 images shown. You have 20 seconds to guess the keyword, but extra points are awarded for speed. View How to Play for some tips.

The game is developed by Grant Robinson, who is working on other projects such as Montage-a-google or Make It-Share It. More information can be found on his blog.

Works Progress Administration Posters

By the People, For the PeoplePart of the American Memory Project at the Library of Congress, the By the People, For the People: Posters from the WPA, 1936-1943 collection consists of 908 boldly colored and graphically diverse original posters produced from 1936 to 1943 as part of Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s New Deal. Of the 2,000 WPA posters known to exist, the Library of Congress’s collection of more than 900 is the largest. These striking silkscreen, lithograph, and woodcut posters were designed to publicize health and safety programs; cultural programs including art exhibitions, theatrical, and musical performances; travel and tourism; educational programs; and community activities in seventeen states and the District of Columbia. The posters were made possible by one of the first U.S. Government programs to support the arts and were added to the Library’s holdings in the 1940s. (Text and images from By the People, For the People: Posters from the WPA, 1936-1943)

Tuberculosis PreventionPrints for the People One third of a nation

Ad*Access Project

Elizabeth Arden advertisementThe Ad*Access Project, funded by the Duke Endowment “Library 2000” Fund, presents images and database information for over 7,000 advertisements printed in U.S. and Canadian newspapers and magazines between 1911 and 1955. Ad*Access concentrates on five main subject areas: Radio, Television, Transportation, Beauty and Hygiene, and World War II, providing a coherent view of a number of major campaigns and companies through images preserved in one particular advertising collection available at Duke University. The advertisements are from the J. Walter Thompson Company Competitive Advertisements Collection of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History in Duke University’s Rare Book, Manuscript, and Special Collections Library.  The advertisements on this web site have been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study.

Burma-Shave advertisement

ARTstor’s Images for Academic Publishing (IAP)

Ever notice the little icons below the image thumbnails while you’re browsing ARTstor? One of the icons simply says “IAP,” which means images for academic publishing. This ARTstor program “seeks to facilitate scholarship in the arts by reducing the costs associated with publishing images in academic journals and similar publications.” Images with an IAP icon associated with them are available to use free of charge in scholarly publications. There are currently 6,700 images provided by the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and 3,900 images from the Mellink Archive at Bryn Mawr College. For more information regarding this program, click here or contact ARTstor.

Making flashcards in ARTstor

Spending hours making flashcards for exams? Why not let ARTstor do the work for you. Below are step-by-step instructions on how to do this.

1. Register for an ARTstor account and login. If you don’t know how to register for an account, watch this video.

2. Once you are logged in, search for the images you’ll need to study. If your instructor posts their lecture images in ARTstor, find them by clicking on the “folders and image groups” link in the middle of  the main page and scanning the list for your class.

3. Once you’ve found the images you’ll need, select them by single clicking on each one. A red border will appear around the ones that you’ve selected. To deselect, single click on the image again so that the border goes away.

4. Once your images are selected, go to the  organize menu at the top of the page and go to “save selected images to…” Here you can either create a new image group, or add images to an existing image group.

5. When the pop-up screen appears to ask you where you want to save your image group, make sure your work group is highlighted.

6. Once you have selected a name and destination for your image group, click on “save and open.”

7. Now that you’ve opened your image group, go to the share menu at the top of the page and click on “print image group.” You’ll have your choice of how much information you want on your flashcards.

8. Once you make your selection, a new window will pop up displaying your flash cards. Here, you can print them out. Make sure that your pop-up windows are disabled when using ARTstor.

brief record with instructor notes

A Digital Collection Celebrating the Founding of the Historically Black College and University

A Digital Collection Celebrating the Founding of the Historically Black College and University is a collection of primary resources from HBCU libraries and archives. It includes several thousand scanned pages and represents HBCU libraries first collaborative effort to make a historic collection digitally available. Collections are contributed from member libraries of the Historically Black College and University Library Alliance.  The collection includes photographs, university correspondence, manuscripts, images of campus buildings, alumni letters, memorabilia, and programs from campus events.  These images present HBCUs as cultural, social, and political institutions from the early 1800’s until today.  See information on copyright and use.  (Text and image from collection website.)

“The Commons” on Flickr

Flickr is home to “The Commons,” a public photo collection that began in 2008 as a collaboration between Flickr and the Library of Congress. It has since expanded to include over 45 institutions, including NASA, the Imperial War Museum, and the New York Public Librar. The Commons is host to thousands of images covering a breadth of subjects, all copyright free.

Users are invited to add tags and descriptions to the photos, making the collection richer and more accessible.


Europeana

Europeana provides access to over six million digital items, including images, texts, sounds, and videos. It is funded by the European Commission and its member states, and includes content from museum, galleries, libraries, archives, and audio-visual collections.

The extensive list of organizations that Europeana pulls its content from includes notable institutions such as the Rijksmuseum, the British Library, and the Louvre.

Currently the online collection is in its beta version, but version 1.0 will be launch later in 2010 and will include links to over ten million digital items.