Making flashcards in ARTstor

Spending hours making flashcards for exams? Why not let ARTstor do the work for you. Below are step-by-step instructions on how to do this.

1. Register for an ARTstor account and login. If you don’t know how to register for an account, watch this video.

2. Once you are logged in, search for the images you’ll need to study. If your instructor posts their lecture images in ARTstor, find them by clicking on the “folders and image groups” link in the middle of  the main page and scanning the list for your class.

3. Once you’ve found the images you’ll need, select them by single clicking on each one. A red border will appear around the ones that you’ve selected. To deselect, single click on the image again so that the border goes away.

4. Once your images are selected, go to the  organize menu at the top of the page and go to “save selected images to…” Here you can either create a new image group, or add images to an existing image group.

5. When the pop-up screen appears to ask you where you want to save your image group, make sure your work group is highlighted.

6. Once you have selected a name and destination for your image group, click on “save and open.”

7. Now that you’ve opened your image group, go to the share menu at the top of the page and click on “print image group.” You’ll have your choice of how much information you want on your flashcards.

8. Once you make your selection, a new window will pop up displaying your flash cards. Here, you can print them out. Make sure that your pop-up windows are disabled when using ARTstor.

brief record with instructor notes

A Digital Collection Celebrating the Founding of the Historically Black College and University

A Digital Collection Celebrating the Founding of the Historically Black College and University is a collection of primary resources from HBCU libraries and archives. It includes several thousand scanned pages and represents HBCU libraries first collaborative effort to make a historic collection digitally available. Collections are contributed from member libraries of the Historically Black College and University Library Alliance.  The collection includes photographs, university correspondence, manuscripts, images of campus buildings, alumni letters, memorabilia, and programs from campus events.  These images present HBCUs as cultural, social, and political institutions from the early 1800’s until today.  See information on copyright and use.  (Text and image from collection website.)

“The Commons” on Flickr

Flickr is home to “The Commons,” a public photo collection that began in 2008 as a collaboration between Flickr and the Library of Congress. It has since expanded to include over 45 institutions, including NASA, the Imperial War Museum, and the New York Public Librar. The Commons is host to thousands of images covering a breadth of subjects, all copyright free.

Users are invited to add tags and descriptions to the photos, making the collection richer and more accessible.


Europeana provides access to over six million digital items, including images, texts, sounds, and videos. It is funded by the European Commission and its member states, and includes content from museum, galleries, libraries, archives, and audio-visual collections.

The extensive list of organizations that Europeana pulls its content from includes notable institutions such as the Rijksmuseum, the British Library, and the Louvre.

Currently the online collection is in its beta version, but version 1.0 will be launch later in 2010 and will include links to over ten million digital items.

Honoré Daumier Lithographs

The Benjamin A. and Julia M. Trustman Collection of Honoré Daumier Lithographs at Brandeis University has made available nearly the entire oeuvre of Daumier in the lithographic medium, making the Trustman Collection a unique resource for the study of DaumierDaumier’s art and nineteenth-century French history. There are approximately four thousand original lithographs, some proofs, and several illustrated books and woodcuts. While the vast majority of these prints are from the large editions done on newsprint, there are also many fine examples printed on wove white paper (sur blanc). These materials are made available under the fair use clause of the 1976 copyright act, and so may be downloaded for personal use, research, or teaching.

Wellcome Images: 2000 Years of Human Culture

Wellcome ImagesWellcome Images is a rich and unique collection of digital images drawn from the biomedial and social history collections of the Library of the Wellcome Trust in London, England.  In addition to over 40,000 images from clinical and biomedical sciences, the collection also contains historical images, Tibetan Buddhist paintings, Ancient Sanskrit manuscripts, and illustrated Persian books. Images on this site are freely available for download for personal, academic teaching or study use, under one of two Creative Commons licenses.

A fly on sugar crystals

Colon cancer cells

British Printed Images to 1700

British Printed Images to 1700 logoBritish Printed Images to 1700 is a fully searchable library of several thousand printed images. Copies and variations of the same print are brought together within a single record. You can search prints by creator, by name of person depicted, and by subject. The collection offers a wide range of print genres–satires, portraits, prints issued as parts of sets and series, playing cards, title-pages from books, prints on historical and political subject matter, natural historical prints, landscapes, and religious prints. The majority of images come from the Department of Prints and Drawings at the British Museum.

(Text and images from British Printed Images to 1700)

Opening History Portal

Opening HistoryThe Internet can be a Wild West environment, and it can be frustrating to locate related visual resources on a given topic when those resources reside on hundreds of different websites.  The Opening History web portal seeks to make this task less onerous by providing organized access to digital resources pertaining to United States history and culture.  Within this aggregation of resources is a growing body of visual images from a wide range of libraries, museums, and archives. Currently, images are being aggregated from over 600 digital collections on the Internet.  Through a single subject search, you can locate related images from dispersed collections.  Opening History is an extension of the IMLS Digital Collections and Content (IMLS DCC) project, a collaboration among the University of Illinois Library, the Graduate School of Library and Information Science (Center for Informatics Research in Science and Scholarship), and the Institute of Museum and Library Services, a Federal agency that fosters innovation, leadership, and a lifetime of learning.

Beta testing of Shared Shelf software

The University of Illinois Library and the College of Fine and Applied Arts have partnered with ARTstor, the Society of Architectural Historians and seven other colleges and universities on a new initiative called “Shared Shelf” to support the use of digital images in teaching, learning, and research. The other institutional partners include Colby College, Cornell University, Harvard University, Middlebury College, New York University, University of Miami, and Yale University. The project intends to make it practical for institutions to combine images created by individuals, those held by the institution, and those in ARTstor’s database—and to do so without the need for local on-site infrastructure and storage.

Shared Shelf visualization

Components of Shared Shelf

Shared Shelf’s functionality will support the ingest, description, retrieval, and display of images, and enable libraries and scholars at participating institutions to share those images across their own campuses, with other Shared Shelf institutions, and with geographically distributed groups of scholars.  Images are accessed by users through ARTstor’s search and discovery environment, which makes it easy to find, collect, save, share, and send digital images.  Individual users will also be able to submit image content from personal collections to institutional collections in ARTstor.

UI librarians and faculty and staff from FAA and the History Department are currently testing the first beta release of the Shared Shelf software.  The final release of the software is expected in summer 2011.  Click here for more information about this initiative.

(Image from ARTstor.)

Pliny as an annotation tool for images

John Bradley, Senior Analyst for Humanities Computing at King’s College, London, visited the University of Illinois’ Graduate School of Library and Information Science on July 20 and 21 to discuss, share, and demonstrate Pliny—a free, publicly available, open source software for note-taking and annotation of both digital and non-digital materials.  Below is a screenshot illustrating how Pliny can be used to annotate a digital image.  You can find instructions for downloading and installing Pliny here.

The image is the frontispiece of Giambattista Vico’s Scienza Nuova, and Vico points out in his introduction that the image can be interpreted as an allegory of the topics he covers in his text.  In our figure the user has used Pliny to label parts of the image that refer to several of those topics, and has also included a couple of comments about the significance of this image for his/her own study.”

(Image and quotation from Bradley, John. Pliny: A model for digital support of scholarship. Journal of Digital Information, Vol 9, No 1, 2008)

ARTstor–Not just for the art department!

ARTstor logoThe University of Illinois’s subscription to ARTstor, a nonprofit digital library of more than one million images, serves users in a wide variety of subject areas, including art, architecture, music, religion, anthropology, literature, world history, American Studies, Asian Studies, Classical Studies, Medieval Studies, Renaissance Studies, History of Medicine, and more.  You can view a complete list of subjects, and download subject guides in PDF format here.

ARTstor authenticates users by their IP (Internet Protocol) addresses when you enter from a campus computer.  If you access ARTstor for the first time from your home computer, start with a search for “ARTstor” at the Online Research Resources page on the Library’s website.  You will then be directed through the proxy server and prompted to enter your University NETID and password.  Once in ARTstor, sign up for a Registered User account.

Users with Instructor Privileges have access to even more features and tools than a Registered User. After logging in, click on the “Edit my profile” link in the upper right corner of the page. Click the “Instructor Privileges” tab. Type in the Instructor Privileges authorization code and password, which you can request from the local ARTstor contact listed in the window. When finished, click “Submit.” You will see a confirmation of your registration.  (Images from ARTstor)

The Digital Image Rights Computator

The Visual Resources Association offers a handy web tool called The Digital Image Rights Computator to “assist the user in assessing the intellectual property status of a specific image documenting a work of art, a designed object, or a portion of the built environment. Understanding the presence or absence of rights in the various aspects of a given image will allow the user to make informed decisions regarding the intended educational uses of that image.”  The interactive program guides you through a series of questions addressing five variables:

  1. The copyright status of the underlying work represented in the image.
  2. The copyright status of the photographic reproduction.
  3. The specific source from which you have obtained the image under consideration.
  4. Any terms of use or contract that may govern the uses of the image.
  5. The intended use(s) of the image.

UIUC Library Digital Collections: Maps of Africa to 1900

The Maps of Africa to 1900 digital collection contains images of maps listed in the bibliography Maps of Africa to 1900: A Checklist of Maps in Atlases and Geographical Journals in the Collections of the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (Bassett & Scheven, Urbana: Graduate School of Library and Information Science, 2000). As such, this collection mines not only the University of Illinois Library’s map collections, but also its extensive collection of 19th century atlases and geographical journals, including the JournalGéographie de Paris (France), and Petermanns Geographische Mittheilungen (Germany).

Arrowsmith, Aaron. Africa, 1817.

Bassett’s and Scheven’s original bibliography lists 2,416 maps of which nearly 78 percent date from the 19th century. Africanists and historians of cartography are drawn to this century because the map of the continent changed so rapidly in the wake of European explorations, conquests, and colonization (Bassett & Scheven, p. iii). About a quarter of the collection dates from the sixteenth century, 9 percent from the seventeenth, and 13 percent from the eighteenth century.

The Library is digitizing as many of the maps as possible, condition permitting. Maps are added to the collection as they are completed.

Saskia Art Images from the Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois (CARLI) now in University of Illinois institutional collections in ARTstor

Saskia Art Images CollectionRecently the University Library had ARTstor load the Saskia Image Collection into our institutional collections area of ARTstor.  We have access to this wonderful resource through our membership in the CARLI Consortium.  You will find the Saskia collection listed under “Institutional Collections” when you first enter ARTstor.

The collection contains 30,000 digital imagesof paintings, sculpture and architecture, including images from many important collections:  ThePrado, the Kunsthistorisches Museum, the Uffizi, and the Louve as well as archaeological sites in Greece, Italy, Turkey and Egype.  The images can be displayed and downloaded in high-resolution format.  Additionally, the descriptive data about the images includes references to the occurrences of these images in 19 major art history texts, including Garner’s Art Through the Ages, 12th edition; Understanding Art, 7th edition; Art and Ideas, 10th edition; and Discovering Art History, 4th edition.

(Images from ARTstor and CARLI)