Interactive Images with ThingLink

I love images. I love links that let me know more about an image. I may love ThingLink, but it is too soon to tell. How would you use it?

ThingLink

ThingLink

ThingLink lets you embed images with everything from text to a YouTube video to a link to your Etsy shop. Hovering over an image activates icons on the image, hovering over an icon gives you a preview of the annotation.

ThingLink will ensure that you will not miss out on any opportunity to share your online presence. Let us know how you are using ThingLink!

ImageSearch from the University of Illinois Library: Federated search for images

EasySearch, from the University of Illinois Library,  is a component of Search Assistant, a resource discovery path for users which allows for searching across multiple electronic resources in a subject area. The Library recently added an image search function by which you can limit search results to images only.  The image search functionality searches and returns results for images from across 25 extensive online resources:  Google Images; Library of Congress Image Search; National Portrait Gallery; Flickr; USA.gov Images; V&A Images; NASA Images; Earth Science World Image Bank; Fish & Wildlife Digital Library; Getty Images; David Rumsey Map Collection; SpringerLink Images; UIUC ContentDM Digital Collections; CARLI Digital Collections; Illinois Harvest; World Digital Library; Europeana; National Park Service; National Archives; Smithsonian Institution; Emilio Segre Visual Archives; AGSL Photo Archive; Animal Science Image Gallery; and VADS.  From the EasySearch screen, select “Advanced Search,” enter your search terms, and click the box to limit the search results to images, then click “Perform Search.”

ImageSearch

Search results with links to found images will be displayed:

ImageSearch results

Beta testing of Shared Shelf software

The University of Illinois Library and the College of Fine and Applied Arts have partnered with ARTstor, the Society of Architectural Historians and seven other colleges and universities on a new initiative called “Shared Shelf” to support the use of digital images in teaching, learning, and research. The other institutional partners include Colby College, Cornell University, Harvard University, Middlebury College, New York University, University of Miami, and Yale University. The project intends to make it practical for institutions to combine images created by individuals, those held by the institution, and those in ARTstor’s database—and to do so without the need for local on-site infrastructure and storage.

Shared Shelf visualization

Components of Shared Shelf

Shared Shelf’s functionality will support the ingest, description, retrieval, and display of images, and enable libraries and scholars at participating institutions to share those images across their own campuses, with other Shared Shelf institutions, and with geographically distributed groups of scholars.  Images are accessed by users through ARTstor’s search and discovery environment, which makes it easy to find, collect, save, share, and send digital images.  Individual users will also be able to submit image content from personal collections to institutional collections in ARTstor.

UI librarians and faculty and staff from FAA and the History Department are currently testing the first beta release of the Shared Shelf software.  The final release of the software is expected in summer 2011.  Click here for more information about this initiative.

(Image from ARTstor.)

The Digital Image Rights Computator

The Visual Resources Association offers a handy web tool called The Digital Image Rights Computator to “assist the user in assessing the intellectual property status of a specific image documenting a work of art, a designed object, or a portion of the built environment. Understanding the presence or absence of rights in the various aspects of a given image will allow the user to make informed decisions regarding the intended educational uses of that image.”  The interactive program guides you through a series of questions addressing five variables:

  1. The copyright status of the underlying work represented in the image.
  2. The copyright status of the photographic reproduction.
  3. The specific source from which you have obtained the image under consideration.
  4. Any terms of use or contract that may govern the uses of the image.
  5. The intended use(s) of the image.